Neighborhoods

Battery Park

Battery Park City is a mainly residential 92-acre planned community on the west side of the southern tip of the island of Manhattan in New York City. More than one-third of the development is parkland. The land upon which it is built was created by land reclamation on the Hudson River using over 3 million cubic yards of soil and rock excavated during the construction of the World Trade Center, the New York City Water Tunnel, and certain other construction projects, as well as from sand dredged from New York Harbor off Staten Island.  The neighborhood, which is the site of Brookfield Place (formerly the World Financial Center), along with numerous buildings designed for housing, commercial, and retail, is named for adjacent Battery Park.

Chelsea

Chelsea is a neighborhood on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The district's boundaries are roughly 14th Street to the south, the Hudson River and West Street to the west, and Sixth Avenue to the east, with its northern boundary variously described as at or near the upper 20s (e.g., 29th or 30th Street) or 34th Street, the next major crosstown street to the north

East Village

East Village is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is roughly defined as the neighborhood east of the Bowery and Third Avenue, between 14th Street on the north and Houston Street on the south. 

East Village is still known for its diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades it has been argued that gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood.

Financial District (FIDI)

The Financial District, also known as FiDi, is a neighborhood located at the southern tip of the borough of Manhattan in New York City, which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Anchored on Wall Street in the Financial District, New York City has been called both the most financially powerful city and the leading financial center of the world. and the New York Stock Exchange is the world's largest stock exchange by total market capitalization.

Flatiron | Nomad

The Flatiron District is a neighborhood named after the Flatiron Building at 23rd Street, Broadway and Fifth Avenue. There are many attractions and stores around the area. 

The name NoMad, which has been in use since 1999, is derived from the area’s location north of Madison Square Park. it has a numerous restaurants serving a wide range of cuisines. 

Gramercy Park

Gramercy Park is the name of both a small, fenced-in and the surrounding neighborhood that is referred to also as Gramercy. 

The quiet streets perpendicular to Irving Place have maintained their status as fashionable residential blocks reminiscent of London's West End. 

Greenwich Village

Greenwich Village, often referred to by locals as simply "the Village", is a neighborhood on the west side of Lower Manhattan, New York City. Greenwich Village has been known as an artists' haven, the Bohemian capital, the cradle of the modern LGBT movement, and the East Coast birthplace of both the Beat and '60s counterculture movements. 

Midtown

Midtown Manhattan, or Midtown, represents the central lengthwise portion of the borough and island of Manhattan in New York City. Midtown is home to some of the city's most iconic buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and the headquarters of the United Nations, and it contains world-renowned commercial zones such as Rockefeller Center, Broadway, and Times Square.

Midtown Manhattan is the largest central business district in the world and ranks among the most expensive and intensely used pieces of real estate in the world, and Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan commands the world's highest retail rents

SoHo

SoHo, sometimes written Soho, s a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which in recent history came to the public's attention for being the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, but is now better known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets.

Tribeca

Tribeca is a hip area known for its old industrial buildings, many now turned into residential loft space. Cobblestone streets are lined with trendy boutiques and restaurants. Historic commercial buildings include the red-brick New York Mercantile Exchange edifice, from 1884. Weekends are quiet, though Washington Market Park and Hudson River Park draw families. The Tribeca Film Festival takes place here every spring.

Upper Manhattan

Upper Manhattan denotes the most northern region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan. Its southern boundary has been variously defined, but 96th Street, the northern boundary of Central Park at 110th Street, 125th Street or 155th Street are some common usages.

West Village

The West Village draws fashionable crowds to its designer boutiques and trendy restaurants. Quaint streets, some still cobblestoned, are lined with Federal-style townhouses and dotted with public squares. Notable venues include the Village Vanguard jazz club and the Stonewall Inn bar, site of the 1969 riots that launched the gay rights movement. The historically arty area also has piano bars, cabarets and theaters.